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May 2007
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Future of the Newspaper Comic Strip

The LA Times has an excellent story about the future of the comic strip, as seen by the likes of Berke Breathed, Cathy Guisewite, and Wiley Miller. They are appearing at a panel discussion in LA on Sunday.

I can't say it better than Mr. Breathed: " 'I don't think you'll ever see another 'Calvin & Hobbes,' 'Bloom County' or 'Doonesbury' again,' says Breathed, 48, who received the Pulitzer Prize for editorial cartooning in 1987. 'The popularity of those strips was built on a young audience — great comic strips are not built on the backs of aging readers.'

"Part of the problem, Breathed and other cartoonists say, is that newspapers, when choosing their comic strip lineup, put too much emphasis on the opinions of aging readers. As a result, stalwart strips such as 'Peanuts,' which continues to run as a reprint since the death of Charles M. Schulz in 2000, and 'Blondie,' which was created in 1930 by Chic Young, tend to remain entrenched on comics pages.

"As middle-of-the-road as 'Blondie' is, it's surprising to learn that it has come to represent a divisive topic in the comic strip community. Young passed away in 1973, and since then 'Blondie' has been carried on by his son, Dean, and is known as an example of a 'legacy' strip.

"'As an art form, comics are threatened by legacy strips,' Breathed says. 'The fact that papers are running [legacy strips] throughout the country is a sign that they're desperate to cling to the readers they think they need, and they're afraid to take risks and find the new talent.'
"

To complete the vicious cycle, syndicates gauge the timidity of newspaper editors, and as a result, choose only the blandest offerings to syndicate.

That means even the bravest newspaper editor has a watered-down selection to choose from if he or she actually wants to find some new talent for the comics page.

In response, Denise Joyce, president of the American Association of Sunday and Feature Editors, "says that while comics are not the huge player they used to be 20 or 30 years ago, they are definitely on the minds of features editors."

"Regarding legacy strips, Joyce admits it's difficult to replace them without making their fans angry. As a compromise, Joyce says her paper is running some comics online and Web-linking to others.
"

Of course, once their newspaper readers discover comics published on the Web, they're bound to discover a much wider world of comics that aren't available in their newspapers, aren't they? Comics that are neither watered-down nor timid.

So, in a way, people like me are indebted to the myopia of people like Ms. Joyce.

You keep sending them, Ms. Joyce, and I'll keep keeping them.

Read the whole story.

Current Mood: angryangry
Comments

To me, "Legacy strips" are like animating a corpse. As the corpse rots away it keeps moving and talking with eyes staring lifeless like some some sick science class experiment with the frog leg and the battery. All the while, the goal of keeping the once living person around for it's loved ones, ends up disturbing and eventually chasing those away by it's putrid smell.
In short, let the comics go! There original creators are pushing up daisies for goshsake!

I couldn't agree more. :D

Amen, brother.

By the time the newspapers wake up -- ALL the way up -- and actually come to us looking for content, webtoonists and other bloggers will have arrived to the point that we may be offering to syndicate THEIR content on OUR sites.

"Sure, I'd love to have real on-the-street reporters blogging under Schlock Mercenary. I'll offer you my standard rate of $5.00 per day."

To complete the vicious cycle, syndicates gauge the timidity of newspaper editors, and as a result, choose only the blandest offerings to syndicate.

No wonder the readers vote for the legacy strips, then. If it's a choice between drek and drek, you stick with the drek you're familiar with.

I think a case could be made for The Boondocks building its audience the same way that the ones Mr. Breathed named did theirs.

OTOH, the rest of what was said applies rather depressingly well to it.

"Regarding legacy strips, Joyce admits it's difficult to replace them without making their fans angry. As a compromise, Joyce says her paper is running some comics online and Web-linking to others."

I'm wondering if the Tribune's abandoned online comics - I can't find a trace of comic anywhere on their website.

Actually, I switched to reading the online edition of the Post, so I read their online comics anyway. I'm still amazed that Liberty Meadows is one of their selections. I wouldn't have thought Cho was tame enough.

But I still end up reading more web comics than tradional comics. The comedy or drama isn't as watered down.